4514961931.jpg 4515405790_340x759.jpg 4514981677.jpg 4515002377_436x312.jpg 4515002371.jpg 4515351945.jpg 4515340165_318x438.jpg 4515002373_328x238.jpg 4515351930_334x437.jpg 4514961929_246x164.jpg

  A town with a river,

or even a stream, always

seems a more pleasant place because of it's presence.  The Brothock was a blessing on the town's mills from the late 18th to the early 20th centuries and indeed her modest volume had been dammed as early as 1457 to form the Mawkin Pool.  Her water is drawn from various tributaries -  Denside Burn, Swirl Burn, Denmark Burn, Colliston Burn, Magungie Burn & within Arbroath's own boundaries Hercules Den Burn, which joins it between Kirkton & Warddykes.  Industrial growth, however, engulfed her fair banks and even today, despite being freed from most of her  labours, she's often hidden behind or under factories, houses, a supermarket & it's car park & perhaps just too many walls. It's an expensive art of course - combining urban reality ( & flood protection) with beauty, but when you do find her, have a listen to her quiet voice - she may tell you that given just a wee bit more elbow room, & if she was clothed here & there with a tree lined path, she could perhaps make 21st century Arbroath sparkle a fair bit more !

The course of the Brothock

through the town in 1822,

it's waters diverted to suit mill demands

 the idyllic Brothock graces St Vigeans

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 the Mawkin Pool around 1880

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Grant Road, & the Brothock goes underground

....approaching

Brothock Bridge between canyon walls of flood protection......

The mouth of the Brothock, in  1880

....she makes her final run to

the sea  landward of a

gravel bank ( now Mackay's Boatyard on reclaimed land)

towards Danger Point

....passing the harbour on

        it's east side.....

The Brothock

hides under Morrison's car park & store, nips under Catherine Street & wraps herself around the bus station before quietly stealing under the bridge named in her honour. She brushes seductively past the harbour & makes a sudden east exit towards the North Sea at Danger Point - perhaps not enough eyes aware that she's been & gone......

 

the yellow line indicates the covered sections

....factory lined as she approaches Catherine Street - not too much room left here for a path....

....The Brothock finds a little space once

past the 'Alma' homes & offers us a refreshing view from Burnside Drive.

Weaver's Close homes are on the left, with the bus station to the right.....

Nice view

- for the

residents of

Dens Industrial

Estate !

On this map,

was an eastern extension of Millgate forecast to cross the Brothock & reach Kirk Square ?

 'Brothock Water' by David Carnegie ( born East Mill Wynd, Oct 27th 1826 )

 

Flow on !  little streamlet, thou'rt dearer to me than the proudest of rivers that roll to the sea

On thy braes as a bairn I aften hae played, on thy banks as a lover I aften hae strayed

Ilk spot I ken weel, frae the mill tae the Kirk; I hae roamed there in sunshine, at gloamin', an' mirk

In summer I've pu'd the wee gowans on thy braes an' slid on thy dam i' the cauld wintry days

When schule-time was ower, wi' a preen for a hook, we wad rin up the Den to catch fish i' the brook

and turn the big stanes the sma bandies tae chase, as they, thief-like wad peep, frae their sly hiding-place

And there was the hill whaur we bairnies did play, but alas ! like our playmates, has weeded away

an' nought noo remains o' the Hill once so green, but the red sandy hillock to mark where't has been

Although sadly changed, ilka spot's dear tae me - they remind me o' joys I may never mair see

an' I hope yet to rest 'neath the green wavy sward where loved ones are sleeping in St Vigeans Kirkyard

Then flow on sweet streamlet, thou'rt dearer to me than the proudest of rivers that roll to the sea

On thy blithe flowery braes in childhood I've played,

an' when death stills my heart may I rest 'neath their shade

 'Brothock Water' by David Carnegie ( born East Mill Wynd, Oct 27th 1826 )

 

Flow on !  little streamlet, thou'rt dearer to me than the proudest of rivers that roll to the sea

On thy braes as a bairn I aften hae played, on thy banks as a lover I aften hae strayed

Ilk spot I ken weel, frae the mill tae the Kirk; I hae roamed there in sunshine, at gloamin', an' mirk

In summer I've pu'd the wee gowans on thy braes an' slid on thy dam i' the cauld wintry days

When schule-time was ower, wi' a preen for a hook, we wad rin up the Den to catch fish i' the brook

and turn the big stanes the sma bandies tae chase, as they, thief-like wad peep, frae their sly hiding-place

And there was the hill whaur we bairnies did play, but alas ! like our playmates, has weeded away

an' nought noo remains o' the Hill once so green, but the red sandy hillock to mark where't has been

Although sadly changed, ilka spot's dear tae me - they remind me o' joys I may never mair see

an' I hope yet to rest 'neath the green wavy sward where loved ones are sleeping in St Vigeans Kirkyard

Then flow on sweet streamlet, thou'rt dearer to me than the proudest of rivers that roll to the sea

On thy blithe flowery braes in childhood I've played,

an' when death stills my heart may I rest 'neath their shade

(above) In 1822 the Brothock reached the

North Sea directly after passing the harbour